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Chinese medicine: Understanding menopause and 9 TCM tips for natural relief

Chinese medicine: Understanding menopause and 9 TCM tips for natural relief

Menopause: the second spring

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, menopause is referred to as the “second spring”. That sounds great, doesn’t it? It also tells us how much strength and renewal awaits us in the second half of life.

Peri- and menopause are experienced very differently from woman to woman. Peri-menopause is the period of time in which the body makes the natural transition to menopause. During this time we can have stronger, milder or irregular periods. When we haven’t menstruated for 12 consecutive months we have officially reached menopause.

In the transition period and as well in menopause, some suffer from sweats, sleeping disorders and dizziness. Others complain about migraines, eczema, palpitations and depression. While others can go through this life phase without marked symptoms.

In many countries and cultures, older women are considered wise and very respected, and experience more recognition than in our Western culture. The absence of menstruation is seen as a natural part of life, it’s welcomed and celebrated. Menopause is not a disease, but a completely natural process. It’s another special phase in the life of a woman to be consciously experienced, and lived through.

In Western society, where menopause is seen as a weakness and a decrease in life energy, women often experience very severe symptoms.

What happens energetically during menopause?

In order to maintain health for as long as possible, it is important to ensure a balance of the energies yin and yang. Yin is water and therefore cooling and absorbing. It reflects in blood, juices and substance. Yin nourishes and moisturises the tissues and organs, calms our nerves thus ensuring a restful sleep. Yang is fire, it is dynamic and gives us drive. It has a warming effect, gives us energy, joie de vivre and promotes and warms the functions of the tissues and organs. Both are equal parts of a whole and interdependent.

A woman’s menstrual cycle reflects her state of hormonal balance. When her yin and yang are balanced she has a regular cycle with moderate blood flow. The monthly bleeding cools and detoxifies the body, cleaning her uterus, cervix and vagina. It’s therefore unhealthy to suppress menstruation.

Many women suffering from: sleep problems, hot flashes, mood swings and acne, experience an improvement when the period arrives and the days after. The reason is that the body gets rid of excess heat and toxins. If you suffer from hot flashes and night sweats during the menopause, you will notice exactly this phenomenon: too much heat remains in the body due to less frequent or no bleeding.

As we get older, we automatically produce less and less blood and qi, less yin and yang. In order to protect the precious yin energies, so they are still available to us in the second half of life, the monthly bleeding stops gradually. The “heavenly water” becomes less and less and eventually stops flowing. Due to the lack of blood loss, the body regains energy. Some women experience this as a real high.

This period of change takes place mostly between the ages of 40 and 50 and lasts for different lengths of time. Depending on the constitution and lifestyle of a woman it can manifest itself in different symptoms.

Typical complaints in menopause can be

  • vaginal dryness
  • hot flashes, chills
  • night sweats
  • palpations
  • sleep problems and insomnia
  • mood changes, irritability, restlessness
  • anxiety, panic, nervousness
  • inability to concentrate
  • dizziness
  • tiredness
  • eczema
  • tinnitus
  • dry eyes
  • dry skin and mucous membranes
  • hair loss
  • itchy skin
  • exhaustion, lack of drive
  • lack of libido
  • bladder weakness, urine leakage
  • weight gain, slowed metabolism
  • headaches
  • breast soreness
  • osteoporosis
  • joint pain
  • digestive problems

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menopause and traditional chinese medicine

Menopause and our kidneys

In TCM, the kidneys are responsible for the process of ageing. They are the root of our body’s yin and yang. As we get older, the kidneys’ yin and yang decrease. The kidney is the big central store of all our powers and vital life substance (essence). In the course of our lives, essence and yin and yang decrease more and more. It’s desirable, and very helpful, when this happens at a steady pace so the body slowly gets used to the changes.

However, our current way of life often leads to a faster decrease in yin energy. Women also consume yin through their menstrual period and pregnancies. Too much stress, pressure to perform and excessive physical exertion. Computers and cell phones, lack of sleep, poor diets and fast food affect us in the course of our lives.

Kidney-yin corresponds to the parasympathetic nervous system and is responsible for restoration and regeneration. When deficient it can show symptoms of

  • night sweats and hot flashes
  • afternoon heat
  • restlessness and anxiety
  • ringing in the ears and hearing problems
  • palpitation
  • insomnia and sleeping disorders
  • dry skin, eyes and mucous membranes
  • vaginal dryness
  • a pale face with flushed red cheeks
  • a red peeled tongue
  • dark scanty urine

Kidney-yang is the foundation of the yang qi in the whole body. Its mission is to warm the whole body to promote the proper functioning of all organs and tissues. When deficient we can experience symptoms of

  • exhaustion
  • difficulty concentrating
  • loss of joie de vivre and vitality up to depression
  • feeling cold and aversion to cold
  • declining or loss of libido
  • difficulty in urination and incontinence
  • water retention and edema

There is often a mixture of the two: heat alternates with cold.

How we experience menopause therefore depends on how well we have taken care of our kidneys and taken care of our female health in the course of living. Our eating and living habits, but also our emotional life have a big impact on the health and energy of the kidneys.

A kidney yin or yang deficiency often shows up with a liver-qi stagnation. Women who have experienced long-term stress in their relationships, have a general frustration in life and overworked for many years often have a stagnant liver-qi. They have the impression that their life isn’t flowing and have feelings of frustration, resistance and feel pressure in their chest.

Common symptoms of liver-qi stagnation are

  • alternating digestive complaints that get worse especially when stressed (esp. change of diarrhoea and constipation)
  • irregular menstruation and PMS complaints
  • mood swings
  • prone to frustration and irritability
  • headaches and migraines
  • weather sensitivity
  • lump in throat
  • frequent sighing

Regular and moderate exercise helps to move our liver-qi, especially when done in nature. A deep and conscious breathing stimulates our parasympathetic nervous system and helps to relax and to stay calm.

Causes of menopausal problems

As stated above there are many women who transit through menopause without any marked symptoms. In Chinese medicine we already see in the years before menopause if a woman will pass this period smoothly or not.

Some factors that certainly negatively influence the state of the menopausal years are:

Overwork

Working long hours with insufficient periods of rest which often result in lack of movement. It also promotes eating under stress which weakens kidney-yin.

Emotional stress

Emotional stress is one of the most common causes for menopausal problems. When experienced over many years, kidney-yin is weakened by fear, anxiety and guilt. Whereas liver-qi becomes stagnant by recurrent feelings of anger, frustration and suppressed emotions.

Smoking

Smoking tobacco injures lung-yin and dries blood and fluids in the body. Over time it weakens kidney-yin. It also can aggravate feelings of grief, sadness and worry.

Eating irregular meals and dairy

Irregular meals, consuming poor diet and dairy foods and / or overeating weakens spleen-qi. It can also cause the formation of phlegm. As a result, slower metabolism, tiredness, oedemas and other symptoms can occur.

Coffee and alcohol

They are both yang in nature and consumed on a regular basis can worsen menopausal problems.
See also my article “Coffee – Is it good or bad for your health?

 

best foods to eat to help relieve menopause

TCM nutrition for menopause

“Let food be your medicine”

In TCM, foods are classified according to their thermal properties and their effect on the individual.

In general, you could say that foods that grow in summer, and in the South tend to have a cooling effect. Whereas foods that grow in winter, and in the North tend to have a warming effect.

The yin and fluids of the body can be supported via the diet, so that the body does not run so hot. Remember that yin has cooling properties and during menopause many women experience an excess of yang. That’s why we want to make sure to especially nourish our yin during these years.

Foods from the neutral to slightly cooling category and juice-building foods should be on the menu more often. As a result, foods with warming and heating properties should be avoided.

9 diet tips for progressing smoothly through menopause

1. Consume mineral-rich foods and water

They are especially good to nourish your kidney-yin. Dark leafy veggies, lentils, seaweed, wild-caught fish, fermented foods, bone or vegetable broth, black sesame, millet, amaranth and quinoa.

I highly recommend Quinton plasma seawater for boosting the kidney-yin.

2. Eat foods with slightly cooling and refreshing properties

Preference is for cooking methods like soups, stews and compotes as they help to fight symptoms of dryness and heat. All vegetables and esp. soybean, dandelion, radicchio, chicory, tomato, aubergine, avocado, asparagus, beetroot, carrot, pumpkin, red berries, goji berry, pear and apple are preferable.

3. Reduce coffee and alcohol

It’s even better if you avoid both of them when suffering from any symptoms of heat and dryness. Both have heating and drying properties, weaken the kidney-yang and if consumed regularly promote liver-qi stagnation.

4. Eat regular and at similar times

Eating regularly, and ideally at similar times, is important to calm the nervous system and to keep blood sugar levels balanced. During menopause the body is going through a lot of changes and eating at regular times helps the body in finding balance again.

5.Drink mainly hot water and herbal teas

Hot water strengthens the digestion and helps to rinse away any toxins.

Herbal teas which are especially recommended during menopause are: Monk’s pepper, sage, blackcurreat leaf tea, black cohosh, shepherd’s purse, passionflower herb and dandelion.

6. Avoid spicy herbs

They have a heating and drying effect and esp. chilli, pepper, pimento, dried ginger, curry, horseradish and garlic should be avoided. Fresh ginger, cinnamon, anise and nutmeg can be eaten in moderation but should be avoided when hot flashes or night sweats are present.

7. Avoid drying and / or heating drinks

Keep your hands off these drinks when suffering symptoms of heat or dryness: green and black tea, chai tea, ginger tea, red wine, high percentage alcohol and cacao milk.

8. Avoid grilled, fried and deep-fried foods

These preparation methods have a heating effect and should therefore be avoided. They can heat up the body even more and worsen symptoms like insomnia, irritability, hot flashes and night sweats. It is better to boil, steam and bake food.

9. Avoid foods that have a hot and drying effect 

Besides the above-mentioned spices and drinks, the following foods should be avoided as well: Lamb, game, loaf, mould cheese, sugar and candy.

Stay connected and drop by on FACEBOOK and INSTAGRAM

Also see my other articles concerning menopause 

Wheat Berry Tea for Better Sleep and Fewer Sweats

Menopause Hot Flashes & Sweating: 6 Natural Ways to Control it

Sleep Problems & Heart Palpitations – How a Change in Diet and Chinese Medicine Can Help

 

How would it feel to free yourself from your symptoms?  Ready to change and invest time and energy to get to the root of your problem? Then book your session now. I am looking forward to meeting you.
The Heart in Chinese Medicine – Is your heart in balance?

The Heart in Chinese Medicine – Is your heart in balance?

The Heart – Seat of the Soul

How is your heart doing? Have you ever had a broken heart? Have you ever been scared and felt your heart beating very fast?

The heart is the seat of the soul in many cultures. Our emotions and feelings influence our hearts in different ways. Laughter, love, joy and empathy for others (this also means collaborative activities) have the most positive influence on the heart. Then our heart energy can flow freely and we feel warm and affectionate. Out of this energy, we can communicate with others on the heart level and feel deeply connected.

The heart and its functions in Traditional Chinese Medicine

In TCM the heart has many more functions than in Western medicine. Let’s look at some of the most important roles of the heart in Traditional Chinese Medicine

A healthy heart manifests in our complexion and pulse. The heart controls the blood circulation in the vessels. When the pulse is full and even and the complexion is rosy, then the person is in good health.

The heart houses the mind “Shen” and reflects all aspects of our spiritual, emotional and intellectual being. With an anchored Shen one is able to do the right thing at the right time in the right place. We will feel emotionally balanced and peaceful, have a sound sleep and a keen mind and memory. We feel alive and happy and follow with passion our path of life. 

The heart opens up into the tongue and controls our language ability. A person who is well articulated, speaks at the right pace and at a normal volume, has a strong heart energy. As a result, the tongue is a normal red colour, normal size, is evenly shaped and is able to distinguish the 5 flavours.

The heart controls the blood. The heart, together with the spleen, is involved in the production of blood and pumps the blood into the circulation and supplies it to all of the organs. The blood is the root of our mind (Shen).

Sweat is the fluid of the heart. Therefore, there is a close connection between blood and body fluids. The blood is governed by the heart and is the main fluid of this organ. Sweating when feeling nervous and stressed, especially under the armpits and on the hands can indicate a heart imbalance.

The heart in Traditional Chinese Medicine

Other characteristics of the heart in Traditional Chinese Medicine

Element: Fire
Direction: South
Partner organ: Small intestine
Climate: Summer (heat)
Colour: Red
Emotion: Joy, inner harmony
Taste: Bitter
Smell: Scorched
Body tissue: Blood vessels
Sound of the voice: Laughing
Day time: 11am – 1pm

Symptoms of a heart imbalance

The heart is also called the emperor of the body. Together with the kidneys, the heart determines the state of our constitution. The heart influences the state of our emotions, mental activity, thinking, memory, sleep and consciousness. If out of balance, it can lead to numerous problems.

It can lead to emotional imbalances like:

Restlessness, emotional coldness, exaggerated joy and enthusiasm, low self-esteem, constant laughter, no humour, forgetfulness, anxiety, insecurity, manic depression, lack of self-love, hardening of the arteries, palpitations, thrombosis, red or pale complexion, excitability, talking a lot or no wish to talk, oppression, frigidity, tongue ulcers, speech difficulty, stuttering, speech impairments, nervousness, concentration and memory disorders;

It can lead to physical imbalances:

Spontaneous sweating, night sweating, hot flashes, low or high blood pressure, dizziness, fears, problems to fall asleep, disturbed sleep or insomnia, excessive dreaming, aversion to heat, hardening of the arteries (arteriosclerosis), heart and vascular diseases, thrombosis, heart attack, irregular pulse, twitching, mania;

Acupressure for the heart meridian

The heart meridian arises from the heart, then passes internally through the diaphragm and connects to the small intestine. A branch runs from the heart to the throat and to the eyes. Another branch penetrates from the heart into the lungs and comes to the surface in the armpit. There it connects with the external heart meridian who runs on the ulnar side of both arms to the ulnar side of the tip of the little finger. You can stimulate points along this meridian by gentle pressure with your thumb or index finger.

Most important acupressure points of the heart meridian 

Acupressure is closely linked to acupuncture. However, no needles are set here, but certain points of the skin are activated by gentle pressure. This helps to relieve pain and other physical ailments, reduce stress and support reducing symptoms. Therefore, acupressure is suitable for self-treatment.

Click on the following link to find the exact location of the points below:

Heart 1 – jiquan 

  • clears empty heat
  • calms the mind
  • opens the thorax
  • removes blockages from the channel

Indications

Heart and chest pain, distention and fullness of hypochondrium, pain in the axilla, palpitations, anxiety, sadness, dry throat, heartache, pain and tension in the flanks, inability to raise the shoulder;

Heart 3 – shaohai

  • calms the mind
  • drains heart fire
  • clears heart empty heat
  • removes obstructions from the channel

Indications

Anxiety, mental restlessness, difficulty falling asleep, sleep disturbances with sweating, heartache, inappropriate laughter, red eyes, severe depression;

Heart 4 – lingdao

  • nourishes the heart and calms the mind
  • strengthens the voice
  • relaxes the sinews of the elbow and arm

Indications

Loss of voice, redness and swelling of the eyes, sadness, fear, anxiety, mental restlessness, nausea, pain and obstruction along the heart and small intestine channel;

Heart 5 – Tongli

  • main point for tonifying heart-Q
  • regulates the heart rhythm
  • calms the mind
  • benefits the tongue
  • regulates uterus
  • benefits the bladder
  • benefits head and eyes

Indications

Excessive menstrual bleeding, loss of voice, stiff tongue, palpations, stuttering, red eyes, eye pain, red face, headache, dizziness, speechlessness, sadness, mental restlessness, anger, fright, agitation, enuresis;

Heart 6 – yinxi

  • clears empty heart heat
  • calms the shen
  • nourishes heart yin
  • invigorates heart blood

Indications

Night sweats, dry mouth, heart pain, stabbing in the chest, nose bleeding, palpations, jumpiness, insomnia, mental restlessness, vomiting of blood;

In combination with kidney 7 it can stop night sweating from heart yin deficiency.

Heart 7 – shenmen

  • calms the mind
  • nourishes heart blood
  • clears heart heat

Indications

Amenorrhoea, scanty periods, mental retardation in children, anxiety, memory loss, impotence in men, lack of sexual desire in women, stops itching in skin diseases, stiffness of the back, arm tremors, contraction of the arm, insomnia, poor memory, agitation, shouting, palpitations, irritability, indifference, depression.

Heart 8 – shaofu

  • drains fire from the heart and small intestine
  • regulates heart Qi from liver Qi stagnation
  • calms the shen and strengthens heart
  • regulates uterus
  • lifts sinking Qi

Indications

Itching of genitals, prolapse of uterus, difficult urination, enuresis, excessive dreaming, psychosis, worry, sadness, agitation, mental restlessness, palpitations, bad breath, bitter mouth taste, swollen tongue, eye pain, red eyes, loss of consciousness, thirst, feeling of heat, chest pain;

Heart 9 – shaochong 

  • clears heat
  • benefits the tongue and eyes
  • extinguishes wind
  • regulates Qi in the thorax
  • calms the mind
  • enhances resuscitation
  • extinguishes internal wind

Indications

Loss of consciousness, red and painful eyes, swollen tongue, palpitations, heart pain, agitation, prevents fainting, severe anxiety, fullness in the heart region, pain at the root of the tongue, manic depression, sadness, mental restlessness;

Relationships of the heart to other organs in Traditional Chinese Medicine

Heart and spleen: The spleen is the basis for producing blood. In addition, spleen weakness can also cause mucus accumulation in the heart area.

Heart and lungs: These two organs form the upper heater and are both of dynamic character. The lungs rules the Qi, the heart moves the blood.

Heart and kidney: These two organs represent elementary opposites like above and below; Fire (heart) and water (kidney);

Heart and liver: These two have a close connection on the blood and psychological level. The heart is the origin of emotions and regulates the flow of blood whereas the liver is responsible for a smooth flow of emotions, Qi and blood.

How would it feel to free yourself from your symptoms?  Ready to change and invest time and energy to get to the root of your problem? Then book your session now. I am looking forward to meeting you.

Menopause Hot Flashes & Sweating: 6 Natural Ways To Control It

Menopause Hot Flashes & Sweating: 6 Natural Ways To Control It

What is menopause?

In the years before and after the last menstruation, women are in their menopausal years. It indicates the transition from the life phase, in which women can have children, to the phase of life in which no pregnancy is possible.

Menopause usually begins in the mid-40s. The ovaries gradually produce fewer hormones, ovulation is less frequent and consequently, fertility decreases. An indication: the menstrual bleeding is more irregular. The cycles are often shorter at first, later often longer. Finally, the menstrual bleeding ends completely.

The very last menstrual period is called menopause and the timing varies greatly for all women. In some women, the period stops at the age of 45 or earlier. Others do not experience menopause until the mid-50s. Years can go by until the hormonal change is complete.

Menopausal symptoms

There are many women who come through menopause relatively easily and have little or no problems. Menopause is not a disease but a normal life phase. However, because the level of the female sex hormones, progesterone and oestrogen, changes during this time, symptoms can appear such as: sweats, hot flashes, vaginal dryness, sleep disorders, mood swings, restlessness, period cycle changes, and a change in weight may occur. How likely and how strongly women suffer from menopausal symptoms is very different in each case.

What causes hot flashes and sweats during menopause?

The reason for hot flashes and sweating in menopausal women is probably the fall in oestrogen levels. This oestrogen deficiency causes an increase in stress hormones such as adrenaline. It is believed that a sudden increase in such stress hormones can lead to heat attacks and sweats.

Menopause relief for hot flashes and excessive sweating

Many women struggle with recurring hot flashes with strong sweats during menopause. Most of the time, a heat wave suddenly spreads over the face, neck and upper body. The face reddens and it follows a sweat that lasts a few minutes, then it often sets in a chill. Even at night, some women sweat increasingly during menopause. This can disturb the sleep as well. As a result, some women experience psychological and physical discomfort.

Is there a way out? Read on for some natural remedies and lifestyle tips that can help you to get it under control.

Hot flashes and excessive sweating: What you can do

Nutrition

Avoid spicy and deep-fried foods and don’t consume:

  • anise
  • fennel
  • cardamon
  • oatmeal
  • ginger
  • turmeric
  • nutmeg
  • thyme

as they are considered to have warming and heating properties according to Chinese medicine.

Eat more cooling foods like:

  • zucchini
  • spinach
  • eggplant
  • tomat0
  • watermelon
  • radish
  • cabbage
  • cucumber
  • sprouts
  • soy products

Your preferred cooking method should be steamed and boiled in water.

A very efficient way to reduce heat and sweating in the body is eating regularly “Congee”:

Congee – Health benefits and how to make this rice porridge

Coffee and alcohol only in moderation

Caffeine and alcohol can lower the oestrogen level and thus irritate the temperature controller. Anyone who has hot flashes and sweats should, therefore, reduce their coffee and alcohol consumption.

Check my article: Coffee – Is it good or bad for your health?

Herbs and medical plants

There are some herbs which can help to relieve hot flashes and sweating. These include, for example, lycopodium which is rhythm-strengthening, cooling and reduces anxiety and restlessness. Ribes nigrum (black currant) has hormone regulating effects and also helps with other menopausal symptoms. Sage is antiperspirant, cooling and balancing while strengthening the feminine aspect (Yin).

Please note that herbal medications can have interactions with other medications. Therefore, please consult an herbalist.

Breathing exercises

Breathing is vital. The body is nourished with fresh oxygen and carbon dioxide is exhaled from the body. But not only that, your breath also changes depending on your mood: If you are stressed, you breathe rather quickly and flat. If you come to rest, the breath slows down again. Deep and proper breathing is therefore important to reduce stress hormones and promotes good health and well-being.

6 Breathing Exercises to Relax in 10 Minutes or Less

Hot/cold showers

Many menopausal women find relief with alternating shower temperatures between hot and cold. At first, you need to start with a warm shower. Then put cold water on the bottom of the foot and bring the shower up the outer leg and back on the inside. Then repeat on the other side as well as the arms with the same procedure. After warming up with a hot shower, repeat the cold showers twice more. The treatment should end with a cold shower.

The right clothes

When suffering from hot flashes and sweating, the right clothes are important and a sweat proof undershirt can do miracles. Wear two to three thin garments over each other. You can then quickly take off a jacket or sweater during a hot flash and have a pretty women’s undershirts on. If you get cooler, put the other things back on.

How would it feel to free yourself from your symptoms?  Ready to change and invest time and energy to get to the root of your problem? Then book your session now. I am looking forward to meeting you.

Congee: Health Benefits and How to Make this Rice Porridge

Congee: Health Benefits and How to Make this Rice Porridge

Congee is a healing rice porridge used as an everyday medicine to heal and sustain your health

Where does this healthy, simple rice porridge come from?

This ancient recipe from Traditional Chinese Medicine heals your gut health and is a real dish for kings. Food is one of the most important pillars of sustaining health and therefore, congee is high up the list! This silky, savoury porridge is an everyday breakfast in China and in some other parts of the world. Congee is also called jook, khao tom moo, and arroz caldo.

What are the health benefits of eating congee?

To be straight with you, you have probably eaten more intense flavoured dishes. However, this simple grain soup is easily digested and assimilated, tonifies the blood and the Qi, harmonizes the digestion and soothes inflammation. It ensures an optimal balance for Yin and Yang which results in good health. If you want to detox your body, cure your intestinal flora, lose some weight or enhance energy circulation, eat this creamy rice porridge on a regular basis.

Which health problems can be addressed with congee?

– red skin rashes like atopic dermatitis, eczema, acne
– water retention (oedema)
– overweight
– food allergies
– digestive problems, especially stomach burning, soft stools, diarrhoea
– hot flashes
– cellulite
– endometriosis
– cysts, fibroids and myomas
– chronic bladder infections and urinary tract infections
– headaches and migraines
– menstruation problems
– recurrent lung infections and respiratory allergies
– congested nose and sinuses

When should you avoid eating congee?

– during pregnancy
– if you are underweight or suffering from anorexia
– if you have chronic ice-cold feet and constant freezing
– if you are experiencing chronic constipation and hard, painful stools
– when feeling very weak and exhausted

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How to make congee?

To prepare congee, you simply need to simmer a small amount of rice in a large amount of water for several hours (3-4 hours).

Ingredients

  • 1 cup rice (around 100g)
  • 10 cups of water

The proportion must be 1: 10. If your digestion is weak, take white rice. Otherwise, I recommend you whole grain rice. Always take organic rice to lower the risk of having arsenic in your rice.

Equipment

Pressure cooker (needs less cooking time, around 1-2 hours) or saucepan with a lid.

How to cook

  • Combine the rice and water in the cooker.
  • Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and partially cover.
  • Continue simmering for around 3-4 hours (pressure cooker less). Stir the congee from time to time. If the porridge is getting too stiff, add more water.
  • Serve the congee in a bowl and enjoy with a spoon. No spices, salt and fat are added.

Congee can also be cooked from other grains depending on the therapeutic goals.

How often should I eat congee?

This depends on which issues and goals you have. You can replace one of your regular daily meals with a bowl of congee. Ideally eaten in the morning between 7 – 11 am as this is when the spleen and stomach are most active. The congee warms up the digestive system and sets a good foundation for the body to absorb the nutrients from the rest of the food that you will eat throughout the day.

If you want to do a rice cure, simply eat the congee for 3 to 7 days. At least 3 days are necessary, as it is during this period of time that a person’s gut bacteria changes. To further help the body rinse out the toxins, it is recommended that you drink plenty of hot, boiled water and herbal teas based on your personal demand. If you have slight problems of evacuation of the bowels, soak some chia seeds overnight in water and add them to your congee.

How would it feel to free yourself from your symptoms?  Ready to change and invest time and energy to get to the root of your problem? Then book your session now. I am looking forward to meeting you.